Tap to Read ➤

10 Best Caves for Spelunking in the World

Ishwari Pamu Jul 22, 2019
Spelunking, aka caving, is discovering mysterious underground caves, not for scientific study but out of curiosity, and is gaining popularity. Here are some of the caves worth exploring.

Your browser doesn't support HTML5 video.

Waitomo Glowworm Caves, New Zealand

Your browser doesn't support HTML5 video.

It looks like a night sky lit with thousands of bright-blue glowing stars. This is because of the glowworms living in almost every corner of the cave. The inside of the caves look like nothing you’ve ever seen before.

Cango Caves, South Africa

Located nearly 30 km from Oudtshoorn, these caves have some of the largest stalagmite formations on the planet. These limestone formations date back to the Precambrian time period, that’s 4600 million years ago.

Minnehaha Falls Cave, Minnesota

This 53 foot waterfall freezes during the winters giving rise to a cave inside the waterfall. You’ll get the best views of the caves during early and later winter.

Reed Flute Cave, China

It’s name after the lush reed growing at the entrance of the cave. This water-eroded cave opens into a fascinating world of stalactites formations created due to carbonate deposition.

Crystal Caves, Bermuda

It’s one of the most stunning caves in Bermuda, complete with stalactites and stalagmites, intricate rock formations, limestone icicles, and an underground lake with turquoise blue waters.

Your browser doesn't support HTML5 video.

Fingal’s Cave, Scotland

This breathtaking sea cave has a natural arch shaped roof, and is popular for its hexagonal basalt rock pillars formed due to solidified magma.

Your browser doesn't support HTML5 video.

Blue Grotto, Spain

When sunlight enters this sea cave, it reflects off of the limestone floor illuminating the underground water cavern an elysian shade of blue.

Sung Sot Cave, Vietnam

Discovered in 1901, it was used by the Viet Cong as a hideout during the Vietnam War.
This cave with its majestic stalagmites and rock formations, is located in the Ha Long Bay which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Stephens Gap, Alabama

You can either enter the cave through the vertical keyhole which is a 143 foot drop or descend down the cave rocks, with caution though, they can be pretty slippery.

Canary Caves, Spain (Cueva de los Verdes)

Formed due to volcanic eruptions nearly 3000 years ago, this lava tube runs 5 miles long and has a concert hall at its entrance.